2

ENCELADUS: EVIDENCE OF LIFE ON SATURN’S ICY MOON

Artist’s conception of Cassini making a close flyby of Enceladus and its water vapor plumes. Image Credit: NASA/JPL

Artist’s conception of Cassini making a close flyby of Enceladus and its water vapor plumes. Image Credit: NASA/JPL

NASA researchers claim on a press conference that they have discovered an essential element for life on Enceladus,  Saturn’s moon: Hydrogen.

This would mean a possible existence of extraterrestrial life.

The Cassini evidence, which we discuss about in this article, detected hydrogen in Enceladus’s hydrothermal holes.

We are getting closer to discover a place that contains all the ingredients of life” said Thomas Zurbuchen of NASA.

The presence of this essential element in moon oceans suggests that there could be microbial life, because hydrogen (in gaseous state) combined with carbon dioxide could provide energy. This process is called ‘metanogenesis’ and it is the base of life on our planet.

Nasa has released a stunning image that captures Saturn's moons in perfect alignment with their planetary parent. The image shows the moons Enceladus and Tethys sitting in a line above Saturn's signature rings, with the smaller Enceladus in the foreground. Image credit: Daily Mail

Nasa has released a stunning image that captures Saturn’s moons in perfect alignment with their planetary parent. The image shows the moons Enceladus and Tethys sitting in a line above Saturn’s signature rings, with the smaller Enceladus in the foreground. Image credit: Daily Mail

Hydrogen was detected for the first time on October 28, 2015 with the help of Cassini spacecraft.

First time when the spacecraft saw the icy geyser was in 2005, near South Pole of Enceladus.

The Enceladus steam jets are associated with a warmer region of the star, after Hubble recorded the new European phenomenon, we analyzed the location on the Galileo thermal map. We have discovered that the steam jets in Europe are closer to this thermal anomaly than we thought’ says Wiliam Sparks, Hubble’s principal investigator.

Credit: Nasa.gov

Credit: Nasa.gov

2 Comments

Leave a Reply