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NASA Releases Detailed Shots Of Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma is already affecting the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico, and threatening Cuba and the Southeastern United States.

NASA Reveals new detailed photos of the powerful tropical cyclone  (category 5). Here is what you should see:

On Aug. 30 at 11:36 a.m. EDT (1536 UTC) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Irma in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Credits: NASA/NOAA, Goddard Rapid Response Team

On Aug. 30 at 11:36 a.m. EDT (1536 UTC) NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Irma in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Credits: NASA/NOAA, Goddard Rapid Response Team

 

On Sept. 1 at 1:47 a.m. EDT (0547 UTC) GPM core observatory found a band of rain on Irma's northern side was dropping rain at a rate of almost 6.3 inches (159 mm) per hour where storm tops were reaching heights of over 9.6 miles (15.5 km). Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce

On Sept. 1 at 1:47 a.m. EDT (0547 UTC) GPM core observatory found a band of rain on Irma’s northern side was dropping rain at a rate of almost 6.3 inches (159 mm) per hour where storm tops were reaching heights of over 9.6 miles (15.5 km). Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce

On Sept. 1 at 0347 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:47 p.m. EDT) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a night-time infrared image of Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic Ocean that showed powerful thunderstorms around the eye. Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

On Sept. 1 at 0347 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:47 p.m. EDT) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a night-time infrared image of Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic Ocean that showed powerful thunderstorms around the eye. Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

On Sept. 1 at 0347 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:47 p.m. EDT) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a night-time image of Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic Ocean that showed a tight circulation. Credit: Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

On Sept. 1 at 0347 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:47 p.m. EDT) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured a night-time image of Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic Ocean that showed a tight circulation. Credit: Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

This is a Satellite animation of Irma approaching Leeward Islands:

The VIIRS instrument on the Suomi NPP satellite flew over Category 3 Hurricane Irma at approximately on Sept. 4 at 04:32 UTC (12:32 a.m. EDT). Cloud top temperatures were near -117.7F/-83.5C in the western quadrant. Credits: UWM/SSEC/CIMSS, William Straka III

The VIIRS instrument on the Suomi NPP satellite flew over Category 3 Hurricane Irma at approximately on Sept. 4 at 04:32 UTC (12:32 a.m. EDT). Cloud top temperatures were near -117.7F/-83.5C in the western quadrant. Credits: UWM/SSEC/CIMSS, William Straka III

In a unique image, NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Hurricane Irma when the island of Barbuda was in the center of the storm’s eye. Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

In a unique image, NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Hurricane Irma when the island of Barbuda was in the center of the storm’s eye. Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Irma at 1:54 a.m. AST Sept. 5, 2017, when it was still a Category 4 hurricane., Night-time images showed a well-defined eye with convection most of the way around it. Both the infrared and Day-Night Band both show tropospheric gravity waves. Think of them the waves generated if you dropped a rock into a pond, but in this case it is convection punching upward. Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM/CIMSS/William Straka III

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite flew over Irma at 1:54 a.m. AST Sept. 5, 2017, when it was still a Category 4 hurricane., Night-time images showed a well-defined eye with convection most of the way around it. Both the infrared and Day-Night Band both show tropospheric gravity waves. Think of them the waves generated if you dropped a rock into a pond, but in this case it is convection punching upward. Credits: NASA/NOAA/UWM/CIMSS/William Straka III

At 2:57 a.m. AST/EDT on Sept. 7, Infrared imagery from Suomi NPP revealed cloud top temperatures as cold as (white) 190 kelvin (minus 83.1 degrees Celsius/minus 117.7 degrees Fahrenheit) from Irma's northern quadrant, stretching through the eastern side to the south of the eye. Credits: NOAA/NASA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

At 2:57 a.m. AST/EDT on Sept. 7, Infrared imagery from Suomi NPP revealed cloud top temperatures as cold as (white) 190 kelvin (minus 83.1 degrees Celsius/minus 117.7 degrees Fahrenheit) from Irma’s northern quadrant, stretching through the eastern side to the south of the eye. Credits: NOAA/NASA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III

On Sept. 6 at 1:45 p.m. EDT (1745 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible-light image of Hurricane Irma over the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

On Sept. 6 at 1:45 p.m. EDT (1745 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible-light image of Hurricane Irma over the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

 

Article source: NASA.GOV.

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