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Rare Images of the Moon

48 years since the first Moon landing.

New generations of space enthusiasts are captivated with these images. Many tend to believe that the Moon landing was a hoax  and every photo is fake. We think you should create your own opinion.

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin poses with the US flag planted on the Sea of Tranquility. If you look closely, you can see Aldrin’s face through his helmet visor.

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin poses with the US flag planted on the Sea of Tranquility. If you look closely, you can see Aldrin’s face through his helmet visor.

Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin stands on the lunar surface, in an iconic photo snapped by fellow Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong. You can see Armstrong in the reflection in Aldrin’s visor.

Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin stands on the lunar surface, in an iconic photo snapped by fellow Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong. You can see Armstrong in the reflection in Aldrin’s visor.

Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin climbs down the ladder of the Eagle to the Moon’s surface to join Neil Armstrong.

Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin climbs down the ladder of the Eagle to the Moon’s surface to join Neil Armstrong.

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt, the only Apollo astronaut who was also a professional scientist, stands next to the U.S. flag with Earth in the background.

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt, the only Apollo astronaut who was also a professional scientist, stands next to the U.S. flag with Earth in the background.

The Apollo 17 lunar module from the perspective of the command module during a docking maneuver. The cloud of debris may consist of ice crystals.

The Apollo 17 lunar module from the perspective of the command module during a docking maneuver. The cloud of debris may consist of ice crystals.

Astronaut Dave Scott pokes his head out of the Apollo 9 command module while it orbits Earth.

Astronaut Dave Scott pokes his head out of the Apollo 9 command module while it orbits Earth.

Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong in the lunar module shortly after taking the first steps on the moon’s surface.

Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong in the lunar module shortly after taking the first steps on the moon’s surface.

Night on Earth as seen from the Moon.

Night on Earth as seen from the Moon.

Astronaut James B. Irwin with Apollo 15’s Lunar Roving Vehicle.

Astronaut James B. Irwin with Apollo 15’s Lunar Roving Vehicle.

The first footprints on the Moon belong to Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong and will remain for millions of years.

The first footprints on the Moon belong to Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong and will remain for millions of years.

Gene Cernan, the commander of Apollo 17, walks on the lunar surface near the Van Serg crater.

Gene Cernan, the commander of Apollo 17, walks on the lunar surface near the Van Serg crater.

Rusty Schweichart holds a 70-millimeter Hassleblad camera during the Apollo 9 mission.

Rusty Schweichart holds a 70-millimeter Hassleblad camera during the Apollo 9 mission.

Apollo 16 astronaut John Young, along with Charles Duke, set up the first lunar surface cosmic ray detector.

Apollo 16 astronaut John Young, along with Charles Duke, set up the first lunar surface cosmic ray detector.

An Apollo 17 astronaut takes a sample of a rock on the Moon.

An Apollo 17 astronaut takes a sample of a rock on the Moon.

An Apollo 15 astronaut walks next to tracks left by the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Apollo 15 was the first Apollo mission that packed a “moon buggy.”

An Apollo 15 astronaut walks next to tracks left by the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Apollo 15 was the first Apollo mission that packed a “moon buggy.”

The Lunar Roving Vehicle on the Apollo 17 mission traveled about 22 miles in four and a half hours collecting data about the surface of the Moon.

The Lunar Roving Vehicle on the Apollo 17 mission traveled about 22 miles in four and a half hours collecting data about the surface of the Moon.

NASA designed the Lunar Roving Vehicle to operate in low gravity and allow the astronauts to traverse more ground during their short time on the Moon’s surface.

NASA designed the Lunar Roving Vehicle to operate in low gravity and allow the astronauts to traverse more ground during their short time on the Moon’s surface.

Astronaut Alan L. Bean was the Lunar Module pilot for the Apollo 12 mission. In this photo he is seen holding a container full of lunar soil. Astronaut Charles

Astronaut Alan L. Bean was the Lunar Module pilot for the Apollo 12 mission. In this photo he is seen holding a container full of lunar soil. Astronaut Charles “Pete” Conrad Jr. took this picture and is reflected in the helmet visor.

Alan Shepard mans a TV camera during Apollo 14. He was the first astronaut to hit a golf ball on the Moon.

Alan Shepard mans a TV camera during Apollo 14. He was the first astronaut to hit a golf ball on the Moon.

Astronaut Charles Duke collecting samples during the Apollo 16 mission. He and John Young were the fifth lunar landing team and collected over 200 pounds of rock samples.

Astronaut Charles Duke collecting samples during the Apollo 16 mission. He and John Young were the fifth lunar landing team and collected over 200 pounds of rock samples.

An Apollo astronaut on a spacewalk, photographed from inside the lunar module.

An Apollo astronaut on a spacewalk, photographed from inside the lunar module.

Apollo 17’s lunar module, Challenger, taken from the command module during its ascent stage in lunar orbit.

Apollo 17’s lunar module, Challenger, taken from the command module during its ascent stage in lunar orbit.

Earth seen from Apollo 13

Earth seen from Apollo 13

An astronaut on a spacewalk with the Moon in the background.

An astronaut on a spacewalk with the Moon in the background.

 

Full article was posted by   on National Geographic.

Images Credit © NASA

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